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Mammals Thrive in Chernobyl Exclusion Zone

Mammals Thrive in Chernobyl Exclusion Zone

The Chernobyl disaster happened almost thirty years ago, a catastrophic event in the Ukraine that would become known as the worst nuclear accident in history. Around the site is an ...

New Speedy Movements Seen in Carnivorous Plant

New Speedy Movements Seen in Carnivorous Plant

Biologists from the University of Bristol have discovered that a particular species of carnivorous plant needs its own category after observing the plant using movements never befo ...

Discovery of Mammals that Survived Dinosaur Extinction

Discovery of Mammals that Survived Dinosaur Extinction

When we think of dinosaurs, we often conjure up images of these huge beasts, bigger than houses, strong and capable of withstanding anything - except for an extinction-causing aste ...

Eight Times More Trees Than Previously Estimated

Eight Times More Trees Than Previously Estimated

A new assessment from Yale University, published in Nature, has found that there could be almost eight times more trees in the world than previously estimated in 2008. Led by Dr Th ...

Fossil Shows Snakes Evolved From Having Four Legs!

Fossil Shows Snakes Evolved From Having Four Legs!

Did snakes evolve on land or from marine reptiles? This is a hotly debated topic, and one that might finally have a definitive answer. In the past, several fossils have been found ...

Are Music Preferences and Thinking Styles Linked?

Are Music Preferences and Thinking Styles Linked?

According to research published in PLoS One by a team at the University of Cambridge, a person's taste in music might offer insight into the way they think. The study was working o ...

All Wishes Come True for Boy Born Without Ears

All Wishes Come True for Boy Born Without Ears

It's not very common, but some babies are born with only one ear because of a condition called microtia, or bilateral microtia when it affects both ears. In the UK, microtia affect ...

Batteries Powered By Sweat…?

Scientists from the University of California have developed a biobattery, similar to a temporary-tattoo, that produces power from sweat. Detailed in the journal Angewandte Chemie and presented at the National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the tiny device is the first of its kind. During vigorous exercise, the body needs to generate more energy than usual. To do this, it trig ...

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First Female “Mathematician’s Nobel Prize” Winner

Professor Maryam Mirzakhani has become the first person from Stanford University in the US to have won the Fields Medal since 1966. But more than that she has made history by becoming the first female recipient of the coveted award. Otherwise known as the International Medal for Outstanding Discoveries in Mathematics, or the Mathematician’s Nobel Prize, the Fields Medal is colloquially named after mathemati ...

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Eggshells: Natural Sunblock for Baby Birds

Examining around 75 species of birds’ eggs from the UK in the Natural History Museum collection, scientists have found that eggshells act as a form of UV protection for the embryos developing inside and have published their research in Functional Ecology. Researchers found variations in eggshell thickness and pigment concentration, depending on the nest environment of a specific wild bird, which is thought ...

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Gold Rush: New Species of Bat Discovered!

Scientists think they have discovered a new species of bat in Bolivia - and it’s gold! The golden bat is of the genus Myotis (mouse-eared bat) and has short woolly fur in a colour that is unique among mouse-eared bats in the western hemisphere. The bat's full name is Myotis midastactus, so-called after the Greek legend of King Midas, in which everything he touched turned to gold. In 2011, Dr Ricardo Moratel ...

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The Happiness Equation

In March, we told you about a study that showed that people who are happier tend to work harder. Scientists have now developed a mathematical equation that can predict momentary happiness, published in PNAS. In this latest study, 26 participants played a money game in which they were asked to make decisions that led to risky or fixed wins and losses, while their brain activity was tracked using an fMRI mach ...

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From Facial Expressions to First Impressions

It is thought that it only takes seconds for someone to form their first impression of you, with that impression able to affect future behaviour around you, and it can be difficult to change that opinion. And while we know not to judge someone purely on how they look - “don’t judge a book by its cover” and all that - and we may even strive not to, we all can’t help but do it. Positive first impressions are ...

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Medical Students Replace Cadavers with 3D-Printed Body Parts

A grim but necessary part of learning about the human anatomy as a medical student is dissecting cadavers. You might be surprised to find out then that there is, unfortunately, a shortage of this vital training tool all over the world, be it for religious or monetary reasons, or people understandably just not wanting to donate their body to science. But a team in Australia may have found the answer! No more ...

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UK Progression Towards Three-Person IVF

In a controversial step forward, a technique to create babies from the sperm and eggs of three people - which could lead to the prevention of some of the major childhood diseases - has progressed in the UK. According to the Department of Health, the three-person IVF (invitro fertilisation), developed by a team at Newcastle University, has been broadly supported by the public with 2,000-odd responses receive ...

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The Heart’s Possible “Grow-Your-Own” Pacemaker

After groundbreaking experiments, US scientists have been able to encourage the heart to grow its own pacemaker by converting cells inside of it, and the treatment could be hitting human trials within three years. The findings have been published in Science Translational Medicine. Pacemakers have been around since the 60s and are an electronic device that is implanted inside the chests of patients with an a ...

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Name that Tune: New Software Can Identify Bird from its Birdsong

Ever listened to a song you didn’t know and wanted to know who the artist was, or what the song was called? Well, there’s an app for that. Much along those same lines, software has now been developed that can differentiate between the birdsongs of different birds, and has been published in the journal PeerJ. The songs of hundreds of species of birds were compiled and analysed, and then "taught" to a compute ...

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