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Mammals Thrive in Chernobyl Exclusion Zone

Mammals Thrive in Chernobyl Exclusion Zone

The Chernobyl disaster happened almost thirty years ago, a catastrophic event in the Ukraine that would become known as the worst nuclear accident in history. Around the site is an ...

New Speedy Movements Seen in Carnivorous Plant

New Speedy Movements Seen in Carnivorous Plant

Biologists from the University of Bristol have discovered that a particular species of carnivorous plant needs its own category after observing the plant using movements never befo ...

Discovery of Mammals that Survived Dinosaur Extinction

Discovery of Mammals that Survived Dinosaur Extinction

When we think of dinosaurs, we often conjure up images of these huge beasts, bigger than houses, strong and capable of withstanding anything - except for an extinction-causing aste ...

Eight Times More Trees Than Previously Estimated

Eight Times More Trees Than Previously Estimated

A new assessment from Yale University, published in Nature, has found that there could be almost eight times more trees in the world than previously estimated in 2008. Led by Dr Th ...

Fossil Shows Snakes Evolved From Having Four Legs!

Fossil Shows Snakes Evolved From Having Four Legs!

Did snakes evolve on land or from marine reptiles? This is a hotly debated topic, and one that might finally have a definitive answer. In the past, several fossils have been found ...

Are Music Preferences and Thinking Styles Linked?

Are Music Preferences and Thinking Styles Linked?

According to research published in PLoS One by a team at the University of Cambridge, a person's taste in music might offer insight into the way they think. The study was working o ...

All Wishes Come True for Boy Born Without Ears

All Wishes Come True for Boy Born Without Ears

It's not very common, but some babies are born with only one ear because of a condition called microtia, or bilateral microtia when it affects both ears. In the UK, microtia affect ...

Britain Close to EDF Nuclear Nuclear Power Plant Deal

The UK government and Electricite de France SA, better known as EDF energy, are close to announcing a deal that would see the French power-giant build and operate the country’s first new nuclear power stations since 1995. Ed Davey, UK Energy and Climate Change Secretary, said: “We’re extremely close for a deal with EDF, and if and when we get that deal I’ll announce it to parliament and I think I’ll be able ...

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Study Reveals Kissing Helps Us Find Perfect Partner

Do you think your partner is a good kisser? Most people will say yes when asked and a study by Oxford University has revealed that kissing is one of the ways of determining if someone will be the one for us - and a way of keeping them that way. There has been much contention over years between anthropologists regarding the reason behind why we kiss, which Oxford University PhD student Rafael Wlodarski says ...

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Has a New Species of Owl been Discovered on Oman?

Have you ever heard bird song and wondered which bird it was? Magnus Robb could tell you, but then he’s an expert in that kind of thing - which is why he was so sure he had discovered a new species of owl when he was in Oman. Magnus Robb is an ornithologist and one of the founders of Sound Approach, who are trying to catalogue all the different bird sounds from around the world, in the hope that we can lear ...

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World’s First Malaria Vaccine by 2016

After 60 years of research and trials, there is definitive hope for a vaccine for one of the deadliest diseases in the world: Malaria. Malaria is one of the world’s biggest killers - about 800,000 people die from it every year. For over 60 years, scientists have been trying to find a way to fight it; GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) having dedicated the last 30 years to researching malaria and developing a vaccine. Th ...

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Scientists Gain New Insights into Autism

A study of more than 800 people’s genes has led to the ‘deleted’ genes offering possible insight into autism and how it develops. US scientists from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, have been studying the genetic profiles of 810 people - 431 with an Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and 379 with no autistic diagnosis. The researchers found that people with an ASD were more likely to have a singl ...

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Tiger Quoll Thought Extinct, Seen 141 Years Later!

There is always one, isn’t there? A tiger quoll has managed to squash the fear that its species no longer resides in the Grampians, by fulfilling its lifelong dream to be captured on film. That might not actually be the case, but there hasn’t been evidence of tiger quolls living in Grampians National Park in Australia for over 140 years, so one can only imagine. For the past year and a half, a remote camera ...

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60 New Species Found in Suriname

There are thought to be millions of species in the world yet to be discovered, but scientists in the US may just have struck 60 of them off the list. Last year, 16 scientists trekked through the heart of Suriname’s rainforest as part of their Rapid Assessment Program. Their purpose was to assess the variety of life in Suriname’s remote wilderness and provide information to determine whether or not the area ...

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Roman Skulls Discovered in Old Riverbed

Finding skeletons while working on the new Crossrail project was something construction workers may not have expected, but they had ample warning with the discovery of Bedlam’s 16th century burial ground on the site earlier this year. They were not, however, expecting 20 Roman skulls. The skulls were found 6m underground, along what is thought to be the route of the old river Walbrook - one of London’s “Los ...

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Flowering Plants Began 100m Years Earlier than Expected

Scientists from the University of Zurich, Switzerland, have found evidence that flowering plants have been around a lot longer than anyone thought possible. The Swiss and German team at the University analysed core samples obtained by drilling into the ground and found six different types of fossilised pollen grains, publishing their findings in the journal Frontiers in Plant Science. Before now, scientists ...

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Chimpanzees Beat Humans in Memory Tests

Over the past few years, scientists have been studying chimpanzees’ memory skills in the hope that they can shine light on some of the mysteries of the human mind. Back in 2007, after spending six months teaching his chimpanzees to count from one to nine, Professor Tetsuro Matsuzawa from Kyoto University decided to pit their memories against some university students. The incredible findings were published i ...

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